Teaser Tuesday: The Daily Five

Teaser

Product DetailsDuring this past week I began re-reading the book written by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser titled The Daily Five: Fostering Literacy Independence in the Elementary Grades. My first reading was five years ago and I decided to refresh my memory a little on some of the characteristics of using The Daily Five in the classroom.

Reading the introduction reminded me of why I like the Daily Five concept:

“We wanted to change the atmosphere in our classrooms and our own roles, from trying to “manage” students, rushing around the room putting out fires, to creating routines and procedures that fostered independent literacy behaviours that were ingrained to the point of being habits. Our goal was for all students to have internalized these expectations and shared experiences in a way that allowed for every child to become engrossed in their reading and writing.” (p9, Stenhouse Publishers, 2006)

I have fostered independence in my classroom and this year I aim to fine-tune my students’ independence. Hopefully a re-reading of this book will help me do so.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

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Teaser Tuesday: The Death Cure by James Dashner

A few weeks ago I began reading The Maze Runner series. My daughter had spoken about this series and her wish to read it so when I came across a copy, I picked it up for her. As she was in the process of writing exams, I decided to open the novel and begin reading. From the first pages, I became engrossed in the story of the Maze that James Dashner had created.

This morning I began the third novel in the series: The Death Cure. The teaser comes from the first chapter and continues from where the second novel ends:

“The rage crept in. Like a shivering rat looking for a spot of warmth, a crumb of food. And with every passing day came an increasing anger so intense that Thomas sometimes caught himself shaking uncontrollably before he reeled the fury back in and pocketed it. He didn’t want it to go away for good; he only wanted to store it and let it build. Wait for the right time, the right place, to unleash it. WICKED had done all this to him. WICKED had taken his life and those of his friends and were using them for whatever purposes they deemed necessary. No matter the consequences.” (p2-3, Delacorte Press, USA, 2011)

I look forward to reading the rest of Thomas’s story. The first two books in the series enthralled me and this one looks to be as good.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: The Cinderella Murder

Teaser

Over the weekend I began reading the story The Cinderella Murder written by Mary Higgins Clark and Alafair Burke. As a fan of Mary Higgins Clark, I picked up this story with confidence. I am only a few pages in, but I am sure to enjoy it.

The story centres around television producer, Laurie Moran, who has chosen the next topic for her cold case series, Under Suspicion. She works on what is known as the Cinderella Murder – a twenty year old murder of a beautiful and brilliant UCLA student (Susan Dempsey) who was found dead in the Hollywood hills the morning after she was scheduled to audition for the lead in an up-and-coming director’s new film. Laurie makes contact with, and interviews, family members and friends who knew the murder victim.

My teaser for the novel comes from the beginning of the story:

“When the phone rang the next morning, Jack popped up from reading the newspaper. “There’s our girl, bright and early by a college student’s standards for a Sunday.”

But the caller wasn’t Susan. It was the Los Angeles Police Department. They had difficult news. A young woman had been found just before dawn in Laurel Canyon Park. She appeared to have been strangled. They didn’t want to alarm them unnecessarily, but their daughter’s driver’s license had been retrieved from a purse found fifteen yards from the body. A mobile phone was clutched in her hand and the last number dialed was theirs.” (p. 10, Pocket Books, Simon & Schuster).

I look forward to reading more of this story.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: Bury Your Dead

TeaserBury Your Dead (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #6)Yesterday I grabbed a book from my TBR pile: Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny. This novel is one of the books I received from my neighbour a while back and I have been looking forward to reading it. I have previously read Louise Penny’s stories about Montreal-based Chief Inspector Armand Gamache and enjoyed them.

The first few pages of the story did not disappoint me and instead made me curious:

“The tactical team surrounded the closed door with its frosted, filthy window. Darkened. 

Gamache paused, staring at it, his hand hanging in the air ready to give the signal to break it down. To rescue his agent. 

29 seconds. 

Beside him Beauvoir strained, waiting to be loosed. 

Too late, Chief Inspector Gamache realised he had made a mistake.” (p2, Three Pines Creations, 2010)

I know that I am going to enjoy this read!

Have you read any of the Chief Inspector Gamache stories by Louise Penny?

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: Racketeer

TeaserTuesday-ADailyRhythm

This weekend I had the chance to begin one of John Grisham’s novels, The Racketeer. The story centers around a former attorney, Malcolm Bannister, who has been imprisoned for ten years.

“How do you survive for years in prison? You don’t think about years, or months, or weeks. You think about today – how to get through it, how to survive it. When you wake up tomorrow, another day is behind you. The days add up; the weeks run together; the months become years. You realize how tough you are, how you can function and survive because you have no choice.”  (Dell Books, New York, p17)

I have not read much of the book yet, but I am looking forward to finding out what he knows about the person who murdered a federal judge – and how he will use this knowledge to his advantage.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays)

Teaser Tuesday: Talk About Assessment

TeaserTuesday-ADailyRhythm

During the last month I have been reading Damion Cooper’s book Talk About Assessment: Strategies and Tools to Improve Learning while following a series of face-to-face and online workshops. Thus far the book has been a wealth of information on a range of topics related to assessment.

I share with you an interesting thought on writing assessment which I plan to implement: “If the focus for a series of creative writing lessons is creating believable characters, then the focus for assessment should be character descriptions, not spelling and grammar, as well. If, on the other hand, students are creating publicity posters for an upcoming school event, then correct spelling and grammar are essential and should be a major focus for assessment.” (p153)

I have almost completed working through this book and look forward to our final workshop next week.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays)

Teaser Tuesday: The Violin Man’s Legacy

TeaserTuesday-ADailyRhythm

Currently I am reading Seumas Gallacher’s first novel: The Violin Man’s Legacy. I am a little frustrated that I do not have the time to focus on my current read and instead I am forced to place the novel on the side table and complete other tasks. This is a fast-paced story and I am curious to know the end.

What follows is a taste of the tale: “Kluvin led the raid, with Jules on his heels as they stormed a fortified hideout in a condemned building on the outskirts of the city. The cell of seven men and two women never saw what hit them.” (p 48)

Hopefully I will have a chance to get stuck into the book this weekend and complete the story.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays)

Teaser on The Wrath of Angels

The Wrath of AngelsLast week was the beginning of the Summer vacation and I picked up a read I had been given as a way to relax. The Wrath of Angels by John Connolly is described as a thriller. The novel, however, is not a thriller in the usual sense as included in the story is a sense of the supernatural. Mention is made of fallen angels, and of a list of those who have signed their souls over to the devil. The story centres on a character who has been in previous novels written by Connolly: Charlie Parker, a private investigator. Through him, we read of a battle between good and evil as both sides look for the list that is in an airplane that went down in the Maine woods.

Early on in the novel, you read the question one of the characters put to himself as he wonders how it is that people step towards wrongdoing and evil:

“Is this how evil is done, he asked himself, in small increments, one step at a time, softly, softly until you’ve convinced yourself that wrong is right, and right is wrong, because you’re not a bad person and you don’t do bad things?” (p44, 2013, Pocket Books)

This question is reflected in much of what occurs in the novel. Is the story an interesting read? It certainly kept my attention. I can imagine the story being made into a Hollywood-style action movie as the pace is fast and the action non-stop. Readers who do not enjoy the hint of the supernatural in their reads, will find this Charlie Parker story hard to believe and may want to give this story a miss.

Do you enjoy a hint of the supernatural in your reads?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was inspired by Miz. B’s Teaser Tuesdays)

A Bleeding Teaser

Bleed for Me (Joseph O'Loughlin, #4)During this past week I have read Michael Robotham’s novel Bleed for Me. My cousin recommended it, saying “It is very good.” I took him at his word and turned the first page in anticipation. I can say that I was not disappointed.

The story of Sienna, a fourteen year old girl, unfolds with the help of a psychologist Joe O’Loughlin. Our introduction to Sienna occurs in the first two pages in the form of a diary entry:

“every drop of blood that flows from my veins is proof that i’m alive. every drop is proof that i’m dying. every drop removes the poison inside me, running down my arms, dripping off my fingers.” (p 2, 2010, Sphere)

Joe is the one who tells us the story of Sienna – his daughter’s best friend. Against the advice of the police, he does a little digging of his own to uncover who murdered Sienna’s father. I found the story fast-paced and intriguing – so much so that I could not put it down.

I have opened another novel by Robotham – and look forward to seeing the story unfold.

Have you read any of Robotham’s novels?

(This post was inspired by Miz. B’s Teaser Tuesdays)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

A Cell Teaser

Cell by Stephen King.jpgAs a die-hard fan of Stephen King, I was surprised to realise that I had missed reading one of his novels. When I saw Cell displayed at the library, I picked it up with no hesitation. The topic intrigued me: an apocalyptic story that commences with a scenario centred around a cell phone. I have enjoyed many of King’s stories and had no doubt I would not be disappointed with this one.

The story begins with the following lines:

“Civilization slipped into its second dark age on an unsurprising track of blood, but with a speed that could not have been foreseen by even the most pessimistic futurist. It was as if it had been waiting to go. On October 1, God was in His heaven, the stock market stood at 10, 140, and most of the planes were on time (except for those landing and taking off in Chicago, and that was to be expected). Two weeks later the skies belonged to the birds again and the stock market was a memory. By Halloween every major city from New York to Moscow stank to the empty heavens and the world as it had been was a memory.” (p.1, 2006, Scribner)

This apocalyptic story is told through the eyes and experiences of Clayton Riddell, a graphic artist who has just landed a book deal. His euphoria is broken when he sees in front of him the violence unleashed by a programme transmitted through a cell phone. Meeting up with others who are not cell phone users, Clay travels north in his desire to find his son.

As usual, Stephen King’s writing is gripping. His story drew me in and took me with Clay through all the obstacles he experienced. Unexpected surprises happened in a story that seems realistic – though of course what King describes has never happened. I finished the story quickly and did not regret checking this novel out of the library.

The story also made me thankful that I do not own a cell phone 🙂

Do you own a cell phone?

(This post was inspired by Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014