A little more of The Library of Lost and Found

My favourite read so far this month is definitely The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick. (You can read my review here.) The extract I have chosen to share with you describes the main character, Martha, and the current state of her home:

“Bin bags and other boxes lined the floor in here, too, all neatly labeled. All contained her parents’ things, or stuff that didn’t have a home, or jobs she had taken on and hadn’t given back.

Feeling daunted by the size of the task facing her, Martha wrapped her arms across her chest. She wondered if Gina had glanced inside the room when she used the bathroom. Her cheeks flushed as she imagined what her nana’s carer might describe her as. A hoarder? A bit strange? Can’t let go of the past?

Could any of those be true? (p213-214, Harlequin, 2019)

The quoted words give you a hint that the novel is so much more than what a reader would expect.

What do you think of the extract I shared? Would you pick up the book?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Ambrosia’s Teaser Tuesdays at The Purple Booker)

Advertisements

A Poem by Julie McIsaac

I was fortunate to win a giveaway for National Poetry Month held by Wolsak & Wynn Publishers. I chose to receive the poetry collection written by Julie McIsaac.

Many of the pieces encourage me to think – about what has been written, and about how the poem reflects my own experience. I share one of the pieces with you:

“They took the bus downtown and when they arrived they sat next to a great fountain. They threw pennies in and made wishes. Then they clipped their hair and planted it in the dirty weeds that sprouted through the concrete next to where the fountain was built. They made more wishes. They thought future. She said nothing. (p14, Wolsak & Wynn, 2018)

The pieces in this collection are definitely raw and to the point. I still have many to read and know that they will not be easy reading.

What do you think of the extract I shared?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Ambrosia’s Teaser Tuesdays at The Purple Booker)

Confessions of a Tinderella by Rosy Edwards

Confessions of a TinderellaIt was a long time ago that I was on the dating scene: going out with men who were essentially strangers in the hope of finding that one person to spend the rest of my life with. I remember the awkwardness of getting to know one another, the dates that did not quite match up to expectations, and the effort put into getting to know another person.

Confessions of a Tinderella by Rosy Edwards peaked my interest. Not only because the story is about dating, but because it describes dating using the app Tinder. I had heard many stories about my son’s Tinder dates, and I thought it would be fun to read about someone else’s experience. The novel describes Rosy Edward’s  experience with the dating app and the men she meets through her use of it. My teaser describes her meeting with one of the first men she meets:

“Overall, he bears a good to his photos; his looks are not the problem. The reason I want to go home at ten past eight is because I don’t fancy him. I knew it from the minute I saw him and I can’t imagine I’m going to change my mind before I’ve finished my drink. I don’t find Elliot engaging; I don’t feel any sexual chemistry and I don’t think we have anything in common beyond the fact that we’ve both seen all of The Sopranos. I’m sure that one day he’ll meet a fellow mariner (mariness?) and they will sail off into the sunset together, tweaking their booms and cleets as they go. The received wisdom is that you’re supposed to ‘know’ when you meet The One and I think the same is true when you don’t.” (p 31, Penguin Random House UK, 2015)

The novel was hilarious as the main character, Rosy, moves from one date to another. I found myself chuckling not only at the experiences of this woman in search of The One, but also at the tongue-in-cheek humour of the writer. I enjoyed this novel immensely and have set it aside for my girls to read this summer.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Ambrosia’s Teaser Tuesdays at The Purple Booker)

Woman of God by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro

During the weekend, I picked up a book at the library. The title, woman of God, intrigued me as did the blurb on the inside of the sleeve: “St.Peter’s square, Rome. White smoke signals that a new Pope has been chosen. Is it possible that the new Pope … is a woman?” The idea of women as priests, and even as a Pope, excites me. It is an event I would love to see in a world that has been dominated by men for centuries.

In this novel by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro, the story centres on Brigid Fitzgerald. Brigid is a woman who, in spite of a difficult childhood, graduates to be a medical doctor. As a doctor she works on healing those in war torn Sudan. As her life moves along, she becomes more involved in the Catholic church.

My teaser comes from the beginning of the book and describes one of her experiences in Sudan while the hospital she worked at was under attack:

“I yelled, “Sabeena! Help me!”

She had her hands full. The girls were with her. Bullets were flying. I wasn’t sure that she had even heard me.

I said to Father Delahanty, “I’m going to help you up. You have to help me get you to your feet. Grip my forearm.”

But he didn’t do it.

He was losing so much blood. He was going into shock. And then he said in a whisper, “It’s been two weeks since my last confession.”

“You have to get up,” I said. I was frantic.

“I must confess.”

I sat back down beside him and held his hand. I wanted to fall on his chest and cry, but I contained my sobs and tried to keep my voice even. “Tell me,” I said. (p 60-61, Little Brown and Company,  2016). 

I am enjoying this book and its unusual subject matter. The topic certainly makes a person think.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Ambrosia’s Teaser Tuesdays at The Purple Booker)

Teaser Tuesday: The Melody Lingers On

Teaser

Every time I see a novel written by Mary Higgins Clark, I pick it up knowing that I will enjoy the story that she has created. This weekend I opened the story titled The Melody Lingers On. The story features Lane Harmon, an assistant to an upscale interior designer. Her current job is to work in a modest townhouse owned by the wife of Parker Bennett, the notorious financier who disappeared with the money of his investors. Lane finds herself moved by Mrs. Bennett’s calm dignity and faith in her husband’s innocence; and is drawn to the son, Eric Bennett, who is determined to prove that his father is innocent. Unknowingly Lane puts herself, and her daughter, in jeopardy the closer she gets to the Bennetts.

My teaser this week highlights the thoughts of one of the FBI lead investigators:

“But we will find him, he vowed. We will find him. 

But even as he made that promise, he wondered if he would be able to keep it. With the Bureau’s focus on terrorism and the number of individuals who had to be watched, resources were stretched very thin. The previous week an agent who had worked with him on the Bennet case had been reassigned. He did not have the heart to tell Cunningham and the investors that if a break in the case did not happen soon, more agents who were working with him would be assigned elsewhere.” (p28, Pocket Books, 2015)

I enjoyed this read – and the unexpected ending.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: The Daily Five

Teaser

Product DetailsDuring this past week I began re-reading the book written by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser titled The Daily Five: Fostering Literacy Independence in the Elementary Grades. My first reading was five years ago and I decided to refresh my memory a little on some of the characteristics of using The Daily Five in the classroom.

Reading the introduction reminded me of why I like the Daily Five concept:

“We wanted to change the atmosphere in our classrooms and our own roles, from trying to “manage” students, rushing around the room putting out fires, to creating routines and procedures that fostered independent literacy behaviours that were ingrained to the point of being habits. Our goal was for all students to have internalized these expectations and shared experiences in a way that allowed for every child to become engrossed in their reading and writing.” (p9, Stenhouse Publishers, 2006)

I have fostered independence in my classroom and this year I aim to fine-tune my students’ independence. Hopefully a re-reading of this book will help me do so.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: The Death Cure by James Dashner

A few weeks ago I began reading The Maze Runner series. My daughter had spoken about this series and her wish to read it so when I came across a copy, I picked it up for her. As she was in the process of writing exams, I decided to open the novel and begin reading. From the first pages, I became engrossed in the story of the Maze that James Dashner had created.

This morning I began the third novel in the series: The Death Cure. The teaser comes from the first chapter and continues from where the second novel ends:

“The rage crept in. Like a shivering rat looking for a spot of warmth, a crumb of food. And with every passing day came an increasing anger so intense that Thomas sometimes caught himself shaking uncontrollably before he reeled the fury back in and pocketed it. He didn’t want it to go away for good; he only wanted to store it and let it build. Wait for the right time, the right place, to unleash it. WICKED had done all this to him. WICKED had taken his life and those of his friends and were using them for whatever purposes they deemed necessary. No matter the consequences.” (p2-3, Delacorte Press, USA, 2011)

I look forward to reading the rest of Thomas’s story. The first two books in the series enthralled me and this one looks to be as good.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: The Cinderella Murder

Teaser

Over the weekend I began reading the story The Cinderella Murder written by Mary Higgins Clark and Alafair Burke. As a fan of Mary Higgins Clark, I picked up this story with confidence. I am only a few pages in, but I am sure to enjoy it.

The story centres around television producer, Laurie Moran, who has chosen the next topic for her cold case series, Under Suspicion. She works on what is known as the Cinderella Murder – a twenty year old murder of a beautiful and brilliant UCLA student (Susan Dempsey) who was found dead in the Hollywood hills the morning after she was scheduled to audition for the lead in an up-and-coming director’s new film. Laurie makes contact with, and interviews, family members and friends who knew the murder victim.

My teaser for the novel comes from the beginning of the story:

“When the phone rang the next morning, Jack popped up from reading the newspaper. “There’s our girl, bright and early by a college student’s standards for a Sunday.”

But the caller wasn’t Susan. It was the Los Angeles Police Department. They had difficult news. A young woman had been found just before dawn in Laurel Canyon Park. She appeared to have been strangled. They didn’t want to alarm them unnecessarily, but their daughter’s driver’s license had been retrieved from a purse found fifteen yards from the body. A mobile phone was clutched in her hand and the last number dialed was theirs.” (p. 10, Pocket Books, Simon & Schuster).

I look forward to reading more of this story.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: Bury Your Dead

TeaserBury Your Dead (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #6)Yesterday I grabbed a book from my TBR pile: Bury Your Dead by Louise Penny. This novel is one of the books I received from my neighbour a while back and I have been looking forward to reading it. I have previously read Louise Penny’s stories about Montreal-based Chief Inspector Armand Gamache and enjoyed them.

The first few pages of the story did not disappoint me and instead made me curious:

“The tactical team surrounded the closed door with its frosted, filthy window. Darkened. 

Gamache paused, staring at it, his hand hanging in the air ready to give the signal to break it down. To rescue his agent. 

29 seconds. 

Beside him Beauvoir strained, waiting to be loosed. 

Too late, Chief Inspector Gamache realised he had made a mistake.” (p2, Three Pines Creations, 2010)

I know that I am going to enjoy this read!

Have you read any of the Chief Inspector Gamache stories by Louise Penny?

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays at Books and a Beat)

Teaser Tuesday: Racketeer

TeaserTuesday-ADailyRhythm

This weekend I had the chance to begin one of John Grisham’s novels, The Racketeer. The story centers around a former attorney, Malcolm Bannister, who has been imprisoned for ten years.

“How do you survive for years in prison? You don’t think about years, or months, or weeks. You think about today – how to get through it, how to survive it. When you wake up tomorrow, another day is behind you. The days add up; the weeks run together; the months become years. You realize how tough you are, how you can function and survive because you have no choice.”  (Dell Books, New York, p17)

I have not read much of the book yet, but I am looking forward to finding out what he knows about the person who murdered a federal judge – and how he will use this knowledge to his advantage.

What are you reading this week? Feel free to share a few sentences from the book in the comments. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2016

(This post is linked to Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays)