Silhouettes

I enjoy seeing silhouettes at the end of a day spend outside. Often the weekends during the summer are spent outside, resulting in my family and I seeing the sun setting behind the iconic CN tower.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
The CN tower in Toronto. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Whenever we have the opportunity, we enjoy watching the sun go down near a bed of water in Ontario.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Sunset at an Ontario lake. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I enjoy as well the silhouettes created by the African landscape. The fingers of the trees rising against the outcrops of mountains is a sight that is familiar to me.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Silhouette of an African landscape. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

As is the sight of workers waiting for the taxi at a street corner:

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Waiting for a taxi. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

A sight that I have not seen often, but which I enjoy, is the silhouette of beach goers at the end of a day spent on a Mauritian beach. The warmth of the sand and the sea continues to tempt those still left on the beach.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Sihouette at a Mauritian beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The sight of the Mauritian beach is always calming – even those beaches that do not encourage too much swimming.

Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

And a view of a palm tree on the beach is a sight that one is assured to see.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

No matter where one is in the world, one can be sure to see a silhouette that is unique to that country’s landscape.

What silhouette do you often see?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge prompt: Silhouette)

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A Religious Relic

Say the word relic and the first thought that comes to my mind is religion. Through the decades, objects have been venerated by people because of who they belonged to or what they represent. Each time I have been to Mauritius, I have visited a place where a shrine has been erected in memory of a Catholic priest, Jacques-Désiré Laval.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
The sarcophagus of Pere Laval. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

Visitors remember the good works he did for the poor and disenfranchised during a time when not much was done to help this group of people. Modern visitors, however, are not only those from the poorest of society. Instead people from all walks of life come to this place to light a candle and say a prayer.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Close-up of the sarcophagus of Pere Laval. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

Each time I leave the shrine, a sense of peace surrounds me and I can understand why believers visit the vault built in memory of this man and what he did.

(For a previous post on this man, you may visit here.)

Have you seen a religious relic?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge prompt: relic)

Mauritian Billboards

I am used to the sight of billboards along the highways that advertise a range of products. In Mauritius, however, there are no highways as are seen in large countries. Instead billboards are placed in most unusual settings. On top of walls that separate neighbouring houses:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (1). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

In the space between the road and a house:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (2). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

On the side of 3 storey buildings:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (3). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

On the roof of a home:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (4). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Or the roof of an abandoned building:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (5). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

On the roof of a store:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (6). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

And, of course, at the entrance into the city:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (7). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

The small island of Mauritius has made efficient use of its space in order to advertise its products. As a visitor, I found it interesting and innovative.

Have you seen innovative ways of placing billboards?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was inspired by Jake’s prompt: billboard)

A Mauritian Street Scene

When we were in Mauritius, we came across a street scene I could not resist capturing. The men were sitting outside chatting, passing the time of day.

A Mauritian Street Scene. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
A Mauritian Street Scene. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

The group of friends was not what attracted my attention though. What I admired was the Dodo that had been painted on the wall.

The Mauritian Dodo. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
The Mauritian Dodo. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

A beautiful dedication to a bird that has long been extinct.

Do you often see painted dedications on walls?

(This post has been inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Viewing Horizons

Each day I look out my window and see the horizon filled with skyscrapers. The buildings reach up towards the sky, blocking the view of nature.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
View from a balcony. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

There have been times when I have looked at the horizon and seen a well-known skyline: the skyline of Toronto.

The Toronto Skyline (2). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
The Toronto Skyline. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

But I prefer a more natural horizon. When we were in Mauritius, I enjoyed the skyline with the palm trees silhouetted against the fading light.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Mauritian horizon. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I enjoyed watching the sun set below the sea, lighting both the skies and water.

Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

I enjoyed the horizon from the beach during the daytime. The sight of the sand and sea had a peaceful and calming effect on me.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Mauritian beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I enjoy, too, the horizons one sees of the mountains: the colours and shapes that are shown against the blue sky.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A mountain view in Swaziland. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Looking into the far distance from a Swazi mountainside always brings me joy. I admire the shapes and the majesty of nature’s beauty.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Looking into the distance. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

Thankfully I get a chance to change the horizons that I see. I may see a horizon filled with man-made structures everyday; but I do prefer the one created by Nature.

Which horizons are your favourite to see?

(This post was inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge prompt: Horizon)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Infinite Tranquillity

The moment I step into a church I sense the tranquillity of the place – especially when the church has emptied of its occupants and there are no longer voices echoing between the walls.

Inside a Mauritian church. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Inside a Mauritian church. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The rows of benches stretch over the interior of the quiet church give one the impression of infinite tranquillity.

What do you sense when you step inside a church?

(This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge by WordPress)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Tempting Colour

The colours in Mauritius seem to be brighter and richer – and this is certainly the case when it comes to the fruit that has been ripened by the warm sun. We were spending the day in Port Louis when we came across this hawker selling a brightly coloured fruit that instantly attracted my eye.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Hawker selling raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

“That looks delicious,” I told my husband. I had to stop and look closer.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Brightly-coloured raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The vendor was very gracious as he allowed us to snap pictures of his wares.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Delicious-looking raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

After taking the pictures, my husband searched in his pockets for some rupees so that we could taste the richly-coloured fruit.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I did not take any of the sugar the vendor offered to sprinkle on top of the fruit. Instead I savoured the tangy taste of sun-ripened fruit. Eating the fruit on the side of the road was definitely a treat.

Are you tempted to buy fruit from sidewalk vendors?

(This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge hosted by WordPress.)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

A Delicious Treat

During our trip to Mauritius, my husband took many opportunities to eat a favourite meal of his childhood: Dahl Pourri. On my first trip with him to this tropical island, he had converted me to this delicious treat so I was willing to eat this meal whenever we could. The roti-like food has dahl within it, and has been rolled until it is fine. You eat “une paire” with a yummy vegetarian curry within it.

Dahl Pourri. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Dahl Pourri. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

We have tried to recreate this food at home but have not been successful. Making them is definitely an art that requires plenty of practice. I know that the next time we go to Mauritius, we are sure to go buy many of these and eat our fill.

Have you eaten Dahl Pourri?

(This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge prompt given by WordPress)

Sunset on a Mauritian Beach

Think of beach time at the edge of an ocean and the words sand, sun and salt water come to mind. Add the idea of relaxation and beauty to these key elements, and you will have the recipe for what I enjoy most about the view of the sea. The best beach moments for me are watching the sunsets, no matter from what beach you view the ocean. On a trip to Mauritius, my family and I viewed a number of beach sunsets.

Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

The first sunset I have shown you was taken while watching the sun set on a rocky beach. We had not spent time in the water, but the peace and tranquillity of the moment was a balm to my soul.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Sunset at Grand Baie. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

The second sunset we watched was at Grand Baie. While my husband and I watched the setting sun, our children played on the beach sand. What a joy it was to see them enjoying themselves.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
On a  sunset beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

On another evening we watched the sun set after a few hours of beach time. Even though the sun was going down, people continued to enjoy the salty water.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
End of a day at the beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

For many, though, it was time to pack up and go home. The next day was Monday: a day of work and the weekly routine.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Mauritian beach sunset. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Another beach sunset I watched was from the chaise-lounge at the Intercontinental Hotel. I lay back in the chair and relaxed as I absorbed Mother Nature’s beauty.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A sunset sky. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

At times the brilliance of the orange sun was astounding.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Marking the end of a day. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I noticed a beauty too in the lengthening shadows and the silhouettes that showed themselves to all those who wished to see.

I enjoy many moments at the edge of the sea. The ones I enjoy most, however, are the ones I spend there at the end of the day. I enjoy the colours, the silhouettes, the sound of the waves meeting the shore, and the sense of peace that fills me.

What do you enjoy most about the sea?

(This post was inspired by the folks at The Daily Post at WordPress.com)

Carefree Speed

When we vacationed in Mauritius, we spend a day on a catamerang. We moved slowly over the water, relaxing on the boat, enjoying the sun and the sea. (You can see these photos in a previous post). While lounging on the boat, a speedboat came by:

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Carefree Speed. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

You could see the enjoyment of the speed on their faces. The wind seemed to blow away their cares while on the water. I felt no envy of their speed, however, as I enjoyed my carefree day on the slower boat.

View from the catamerang. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
View from the catamerang. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Do you enjoy moving swiftly over the ocean’s water?

(This post was inspired the the weekly photo challenge prompt given by The Daily Post)