Irony

PHOTO PROMPT © Penny Gadd

The plant grew and crept along the wall, its leafy tendrils exploring the pristine wall. The creeper had been genetically altered and transformed into a listening device. In another part of the city, revolutionaries listened to the unfettered conversations of councilmen; conversations that lingered on the changes to bylaws that would prohibit personal freedom.

Prior knowledge enabled the freedom fighters to overcome those in power. In their victory, they claimed that freedom was a person’s right.

Once in power, the new leader ensured no plants graced the surfaces of his home and office. Then he began to enslave the majority.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

Advertisements

A Living Room Couch

The living room couch was like Grand Central Station: a flurry of daytime activity surrounded it.

Quick early morning cups of coffee were spilt on on the sofa before resting purses and briefcases were hurriedly grabbed from its centre. Once the early morning bustle was over, a sigh was heard and feet were placed on the overstuffed cushions. The lull in activity was welcomed before the beige couch was surrounded by the whoosh of the vacuum and the scent of polish.

Around noon either the twitter of book-club ladies, the rowdiness of the bingo group, or the tranquil chatter of the knitting club as preemie blankets were created was heard. Even though the space was busy, there was a calmness in the activity.

The afternoon lull was short before the plump seats were jumped on by energetic feet happy to be home. Snacks were eaten in the deep recesses of the cushions while in the next room the unmistakable sound of oil sizzled in a pan.

Bathtime.

Dinnertime.

The couch was unused, but the sounds nearby did not bring serenity.

Then a favourite part of the day: storytime and the snuggles between parents and children.

The lull before the quiet.

Bedtime.

Parent time while the television buzzes softly in the background.

Then the living room turns dark and the sounds of the night encroach.

The house sleeps as does the couch; resting fully and preparing itself for the repetition of the early morning routine mayhem.

A couch’s work is never done.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post is linked to Linda G. Hill’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday challenge)

No Change

She was always the life of the party: moving from group to group, laughing and dancing the night away.

The accident left her paralysed from the waist down. People mourned her lack of movement. “She will not be able to dance!” they said. “She will loose her zest for life,” they said.

They did not know that nothing would get her down – certainly not the accident that derailed her life.

She is still the life of the party. The difference now is that her life-long partner is obliged to participate in her party antics while wheeling her about the room.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

Vindication

PHOTO PROMPT © Ted Strutz

The sight of the seaplane meant the influx of summer visitors had begun. Their arrival brought a buzz to the shoreline and increased revenue to many. But Jack did not look forward to the return of the family that had embraced him last year, then rejected him on the eve of their departure based on malicious gossip. He had thought their relationship stronger.

Days later, he saw them. She was cradling a baby in her arms and her parents were shame-faced. They had realised the error of their accusations when the child was born. He was obviously not Jack’s.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

Remnant

Standing in front of the carved stone, he remembered when the artist was feted. People would travel from all over the world to see his work and admire his handiwork. Discussions would ensue on the meaning of the pieces and what had inspired him to create them. Then the scandal erupted. He was imprisoned, the many artworks torn down or vandalised. Except for this forgotten piece in the centre of the city. Unnamed, the early work stands proudly surrounded by office buildings. A remnant of a life that was crushed to pieces by the love for a young girl.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

Waiting

PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

The hardest part about setting out on a new adventure is the waiting. All I want to do is move, step forward, experience the new. Instead, I am forced to stay in one spot for hours and wait for a stranger to announce that the first step into my new venture is to begin. Not for the first time, I wish I had the money to bypass the regulations thus allowing me to move unfettered towards my destination. Unfortunately, I am merely a part of the herd.

“The flight to Beruit is now boarding.”

Finally! A new life awaits.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

When I Was Young …

PHOTO PROMPT © Valerie J. Barrett

Visiting the museum with Gerald was always such a risk. So far, though, the day had been all that she had wanted and planned. The group had seen some beautiful paintings; the children had been interested in the artifacts unearthed by archaeologists in central Europe; lunch had been surprisingly tasty; and no-one had wanted to cut the visit short due to boredom. They all moved down to the basement to look at the exhibit labelled “Though the Ages”. In front of the first exhibit, she held her breath. Predictably Gerald began, “When I was young …” Everyone groaned!

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

First Line Fridays: I Owe You One by Sophie Kinsella

“The trouble with me is, I can’t let things go. They bug me. I see problems and I want to fix them, right here, right now. My nickname isn’t Fixie for nothing”

I Owe You One by Sophie Kinsella (2019, Penguin Random House Canada)

The opening lines of Kinsella’s latest novel introduces us to Fixie, the main character. Throughout the novel we read how she continuously works to fix things and how she allows opportunities to pass her by because of this. And yet she has a chance to grow and to learn when to let things be. I enjoyed Kinsella’s latest rom-com and if you enjoy reading this genre, you will too. If you want to know more, you can read my review here.

What do you think of the introduction to the main character? Are you curious about her?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post is linked to It’s Not Hoarding If It’s Books and her One Line Friday challenge.)

A New Start

PHOTO PROMPT © Ceayr

The setting to her new home was perfect! The rooms above the garage led to a view of the crashing ocean and the start of a different life. She would not miss the grey skies and gloomy house she grew up in. She would certainly not miss her austere father who insisted on curbing her movements! Here she would follow her inclination to dress as people her age do, to paint the entire day if she wished, and to make friends with whomever she pleased. Not only was her new home promising but also her life far from Gleneagles.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

First Line Fridays: All The Wrong Places by Joy Fielding

“So tell me about yourself,” he says. He smiles what he hopes is a sweet smile – neither too big nor too small, one that hints at a wry, maybe even offbeat sense of humour that he thinks would appeal to her. He wants to charm her. He wants her to like him.”

All the Wrong Places by Joy Fielding (2019,Penguin Random House Canada)

Fielding begins her novel with a description of the online predator that plays an important role in her story. I like that right from the start the reader knows his intentions – and that he deliberately plans to ensnare women.

I loved this fast-paced thriller. If you want to know more, you can read my review here.

What do you think of the introduction to the online predator?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This post is linked to It’s Not Hoarding If It’s Books and her One Line Friday challenge.)