A Visiting Artisan

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

When the opportunity came for me to leave my village and travel to a country across the world, I jumped at it. I have spent my entire life living in the place I was born. The hills and the grasses are well-known to me. I have walked the paths through the fields many times over. The children I grew up with have, like me, married and have had children. Each day we toil to bring food into our homes. I am lucky – there is no reason for me to go out into the fields. Instead I work from home, using my skills to create the small sculptures and ornaments with which my people love to adorn their homes.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Now I find myself in Canada, showing people the work I love to do. They look on in interest as I roll and mold the modelling clay. The panda bear I am making takes shape in front of their eyes. To me, this skill is not at all unique – there are a number of us in China that create these little sculptures. It seems though, from the reaction I see, that this skill is not practised by many here. The young children look on in interest and I hope that they will go home and try to recreate the animals of their choice.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

 

Roll, roll, smooth. The movement is soothing to me. The surrounding chatter in a foreign language could be overwhelming for me but I allow the calming nature of my art take over. I choose the colours I need from my tray, covering the clay afterwards to ensure it doesn’t dry. The panda is almost finished and I begin to think of what it is I can create next. Something that the children will enjoy seeing. Maybe another animal, a tiger perhaps. I have noticed that the young ones here enjoy seeing animals. They exclaim over the small depictions and many of them have taken one home.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

As I work under this tent, I marvel at the fact that I am here in this country. I feel proud to have been chosen to represent our culture to those so far from home. Sitting here I have seen many whose ancestors were born in China. These people are unable to speak the language of my country and would have difficulty understanding my experiences. However, I can see that they are hungry to learn more about the culture of their forefathers. Hopefully I will be able to help them find that part of themselves.

 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

After today’s work, the artisans will be taken on a small tour of this place we find ourselves in. I will enjoy the change and the new experiences. Then I will happily return to my people and my family. I will return home where I will be understood when I speak, and where I can eat the food I am used to. And as I return, I will leave behind small pieces of myself in the art I sold to the admirers I had this weekend.

Do you create with modelling clay?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was inspired by Amanda’s Pixel Prose Challenge)

Previous posts on the artisans visiting Toronto:

A Chinese Papercutter

Chinese Artists

A Chinese Woodcarver

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Chinese Artists

As you know, my family and I attended the China now! festival and saw a number of artisans from China who create using their hands. We did not see the artist who used the ink tools below as he was taking a break.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Ink pot and tools. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

We did, however, admire the drawing he was creating with the black ink.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
A Chinese-style drawing. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Next to this station was the man responsible for giving colour to the drawings. Using a fine tipped brush, he painted in the drawings that are so synonymous with Chinese culture.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Painting the inked drawings. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

As we watched, he painted in a small section of the drawing with small, fine strokes.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
A Chinese artists at work. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

I have seen many pictures like this in the past – many of them photocopies. The copier does not do justice to the textures and tones that this artist was creating.

Do you enjoy looking at Chinese-style paintings?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was written to be a part of Paula’s Thursday Special. Head on over to her to see what other interesting submissions have been made.)

Photos of other Chinese artisans I have shared so far:

The wood carver

The paper cutter