Book Review: The Neighbors by Hannah Mary McKinnon

I had never read anything written by Hannah Mary McKinnin. The concept for The Neighbors sounded interesting so I decided to pick it up.

Genre: Thriller, Mystery

Blurb:

In 1992, a car accident kills a young man and forever changes the lives of three people… Now, twenty years later, they’ll all come to regret the choices they made that day, as the secrets and lies they’ve told to protect each other become the very things that tear their lives apart.

After a night of fun, Abby was responsible for the car crash that killed her beloved brother. It is a sin she can never forgive herself for, so she pushes away the man she loves most, knowing that he would eventually hate her for what she’s done, the same way she hates herself.

Twenty years later, Abby’s husband, Nate, is also living with a deep sense of guilt. He was the driver who first came upon the scene of Abby’s accident, the man who pulled her to safety before the car erupted in flames, the man who could not save her brother in time. It’s this guilt, this regret that binds them together. They understand each other. Or so Nate believes.

In a strange twist of fate, Liam (her old lover—possibly her true soulmate) moves in with his own family next door, releasing a flood of memories that Abby has been trying to keep buried all these years. Abby and Liam, in a complicit agreement, pretend never to have met, yet cannot resist the pull of the past—nor the repercussions of the dark secrets they’ve both been carrying… 

My thoughts:

Goodreads describes the story as a thriller but it is more a human drama with a dash of mystery.

The story deals with two people who have unfinished business and, in part, goes along as one would expect. However as the story unfolds, a few little twists are added to the events that do turn everything upside down. The twists are caused by hidden truths and lies that, if revealed, would cause plenty of hurt and emotional destruction.

Deceit is definitely a thread that runs through McKinnon’s story. Hiding truths is so much a part of people’s lives – but some truths are more harmful than others. In The Neighbors, the truths are revealed slowly. As I realised certain facts, I could not help turning the pages quickly as I did want to know how these deceits would affect the lives of the characters. Having said that, The Neighbors is not an action-packed story that will have you racing to the end. It is, instead, a novel filled with human drama told in a way that keeps the reader interested.

I enjoyed reading McKinnon’s work and I will pick up another title by her. The Neighbors is a story for you if you enjoy reading novels featuring the drama of human relationships.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 3 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 99th in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: Soon The Light Will Be Perfect by Dave Patterson

Soon The Light Will Be Perfect by Dave Patterson is one of the ARCs I picked up at the OLA Super Conference at the beginning of this year. As I was going on vacation, I thought it would be a perfect time to read this novel set in the past. I did not have a chance to read it when relaxing on holiday, but when I flew back home from the Dominican Republic, I carried Dave Patterson’s novel in my bag. At 251 pages, I thought it would be long enough to read on the 4 hour return flight. Even though my husband and I were flying together, we were unlucky enough to be separated on the plane and, because there were no in-flight screens on the plane, the only thing I had to do on the journey was read.

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, Coming of Age

Blurb:

A 12-year-old altar boy lives with his family in a small, poverty stricken town in Vermont. His father works at a manufacturing plant, his mother is a homemaker, and his fifteen-year-old brother is about to enter high school. His family has gained enough financial stability to move out of the nearby trailer park, and as conflict rages abroad, his father’s job at a weapons manufacturing plant appears safe. But then his mother is diagnosed with cancer, and everything changes.

As his family clings to the traditions of their hard-lined Catholicism, the narrator begins to see how ideology and human nature are often at odds. He meets Taylor, a perceptive, beguiling girl from the trailer park, a girl who has been forced to grow up too fast. Taylor represents everything his life as an altar boy isn’t, and their fledgling connection develops as his mother’s health deteriorates.

Set over the course of one propulsive summer, Soon the Light Will be Perfect chronicles the journey of a young man on the cusp of adulthood, a town battered by poverty, and a family at a breaking point. In spare, fiercely honest prose, Dave Patterson captures what it feels like to be gloriously, violently alive at a moment of political, social, and familial instability. 

My thoughts:

The novel is a coming-of-age story set in the 60s and the family described is barely getting by financially. As I was reading the story, I could imagine the setting easily as I thought back to the films I had seen on television when I was a teenager. Even though I had not grown up in Vermont during that time period, it did feel familiar to me.

The story focuses on a young boy whose mother is diagnosed with cancer. He sees his mother growing weaker – and not giving up on her tasks and responsibilities. He sees his father lose his job and taking up anything to bring in a paycheck. He sees his older brother showing interest in a girl and spending less time with him. Because of his experiences at home and in the church, he realises that he needs to decide what is important to him and what it is that he wants to do with his time. He is a young boy growing up during the Vietnam war and during a time in America when things were changing.

The book was interesting and held my attention during the flight. It is not a fast-paced read and instead ambles along as a boy’s childhood would. The content did cause flashbacks to a different time when values and social issues were different. The novel is described as a book for young adults. I would state, however, that it is a novel for teens who enjoy a more literary type of novel – Soon The Light Will Be Perfect is not one that will be enjoyed by those looking for adventure stories or even a teen romance. Instead it slowly describes the change in a twelve year old’s life over a summer period.

I did enjoy Patterson’s novel even though it is a story I would not reread. It was well-written with a sensitivity to the time period and a boy’s entrance into adolescence. Well worth a read if you enjoy coming-of-age stories.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 3 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 98th in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: The Perfect Wife by J.P. Delaney

I won a giveaway hosted by Penguin Random House Canada for an ARC of The Perfect Wife by D. P. Delaney. When I received it, I admired the cover and, when choosing a book to take with me on vacation, I could not help but pick this one up.

Genre: Thriller, Suspense, Mystery

Blurb:

Abbie awakens in a daze with no memory of who she is or how she landed in this unsettling condition. The man by her side claims to be her husband. He’s a titan of the tech world, the founder of one of Silicon Valley’s most innovative start-ups. He tells Abbie that she is a gifted artist, an avid surfer, a loving mother to their young son, and the perfect wife. He says she had a terrible accident five years ago and that, through a huge technological breakthrough, she has been brought back from the abyss.

She is a miracle of science.

But as Abbie pieces together memories of her marriage, she begins questioning her husband’s motives–and his version of events. Can she trust him when he says he wants them to be together forever? And what really happened to Abbie half a decade ago?

My thoughts:

When reading the novel, I realised that there is an interesting aspect in this novel that is not suggested in the blurb making this read even more interesting. I do not want to say too much in case I spoil it for you, but know that it has a futuristic appeal to it that I enjoyed. The viewpoint definitely adds an interesting twist in this psychological thriller – a twist that I have not yet read in this genre.

The Perfect Wife is a fast-paced read that was perfect for a vacation read. I had the time to enjoy the story that Delaney created and I was never bored nor wished for another book sitting on my shelves at home. The writer references the marriage between a man and a woman as well as the power dynamics in their relationship. The woman (who is slowly encouraged to take the part of the submissive) is shown to slowly change her sense of self to fit in with her husband’s belief of what their relationship should be. The little nuggets of Abbie and Tim’s relationship are fed to the reader slowly as you begin to grasp what is actually happening in the story.

During the story we see Abbie growing as a person as her memories of the past filter in. It is interesting to see how she begins to understand her relationship with Tim and with the other people in her life. Abbie is a character that grows during the story. The description of her growth is integrated seamlessly into the story and with such skill that I found I was cheering her on.

As I have said, Delaney’s story is a little different to the usual and has a few unexpected twists thrown in – some of which I was unable to predict. I certainly did not predict the big one at the end of the story! An ending which, by the way, I loved. If you are looking for a psychological thriller that has an unusual bent, then The Perfect Wife is the perfect read for you to pick up.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 97th in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: Missing Daughter by Rick Mofina

At the OLA Super Conference earlier on in the year, I had the chance to receive a signed ARC of Rick Mofina’s latest novel Missing Daughter.

Genre: Thriller, Suspense

Blurb:

Life can change in an instant. For Ryan and Karen Lane, it happens on the morning they discover their twelve-year-old daughter’s window open, their beloved Maddie missing from her bed.

Police investigate. Suspicions swirl. A teenage boy admits he was outside her bedroom window the night she disappeared. A halfway house for convicts recently opened in the neighborhood. The Lane family is thrown into turmoil, then detectives turn their sights on them.

No one is ruled out. Not Karen, with her tragic past, who argued with her daughter. Not Ryan, with his violent streak. Not Maddie’s thirteen-year-old brother, Tyler, who heard voices in her room the night she vanished.

Days, weeks, months, then agonizing years go by without answers, the Lanes fearing that Maddie is gone forever…until a stunning twist shocks everyone, plunging the family deeper into a world of buried secrets whose revelations threaten the very foundation of their lives.

My thoughts:

A parent’s’ nightmare is to wake up and find that your young daughter is missing from her bed. This is what happens to Ryan and Karen Lane. They discover that their twelve year old daughter, Maddie, is missing from her bed with the window open. Mofina describes perfectly the anguish and fear of the parents and her brother and, while I was reading about the accusations against them by the police and the media, I could feel their pain.

Missing Daughter is a well written thriller that is evenly paced. There was at no time in the novel that I felt bored but instead my mind kept working as I attempted to solve the mystery of who was involved with Maddie’s disappearance. I worked out a little, but most of the ending I did not foresee.

Mofina’s latest novel is well worth a read and is perfect for fans of thrillers. Not as twisty as a psychological thriller, but full of suspense nonetheless.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 3 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 96th in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: After Kilimanjaro by Gayle Woodson

On Instagram, I came across the Booksparks programme. I took a chance and applied to read and review one of their books because the blurb interested me. I was happy when I received the email stating that I would be able to participate in promoting After Kilimanjaro by Gayle Woodson. The topic of the novel interested me, as well as the fact that it is set in an African country.

Genre: Adult Contemporary

Blurb:

Dr. Sarah Whitaker has always been an obedient overachiever, but she is burned out. Training to be a surgeon is stressful. So when her fiancé, David, offers a solution—take a break year at a hospital in Africa and climb Mount Kilimanjaro together—she jumps on board. When he backs out, she embarks on the adventure alone.

Sarah quickly falls in love with Tanzania, a land of gentle people, exotic wildlife, and stunning natural beauty, from the sands of Zanzibar to the peaks of Kilimanjaro. She also develops great respect for new Tanzanian friends: strong African women who strive to serve an overwhelming need for health care. Shocked by the high rate of maternal mortality and the scourge of female genital mutilation in the country, Sarah begins to speak out against FGM and develops an experimental program to train tribal birth attendants in a remote mountain village. Conditions are primitive there, and life is fragile.

The separation takes its toll on her relationship with David, and she fights against feelings for another man. As the months pass, one thing becomes clear: if Sarah survives this year, her life will never be the same again. 

My thoughts:

After Kilimanjaro surprised me and I enjoyed it so much more than I thought I would. I expected a serious read and, although the main character shows the reader some serious issues, there were moments that made me smile (such as the budding romance between Sarah and one of her colleagues).

Woodson often makes references to the dire medical straits in Tanzania as well female genital mutilation (FGM). These references, however, are integrated seamlessly into the story and form a part of Sarah’s experience. The descriptions of the Tanzanian women’s experience are powerful and give the reader the opportunity to think about the African woman’s experience. To be honest, after reading these descriptions I did feel grateful to have grown up outside of this practice. Although the novel does not focus entirely on FGM, it does bring the issue up in the reader’s mind and encourages us to think about it.

This novel is truly about Sarah’s story. She is a woman who seems to be following the path that is expected of her by others. She moves off the path and spends a year in Tanzania working with people and in hospitals that have so far been out of her experience. She teaches others and passes on a lot of her knowledge. However, she also learns from the people she is teaching and from her patients. I love how she grows as a character in the story; how she finds her inner strength and the knowledge that she can change direction and follow a passion.

After Kilimanjaro is a contemporary read – but not like the ones I have read recently. The setting is different from the usual; and the experience of the characters is out of the norm. I enjoyed this read and would recommend it to any reader who is looking for a story about a woman who grows into herself; and whose experiences encourage her to change direction in her life.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 95th in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: The Fever by Thomas Fenske

Thomas Fenske, an independent author, contacted me to read and review his book. The blurb sounded interesting and I decided to give it a read as I do like to support indie authors.

Genre: Adult Contemporary

Blurb:

Sam Milton is just a typical, normal guy living an ordinary life until a chance deathbed confession changes him forever:

“There’s a gold mine out there … ya gotta follow the devil and look for the table, then turn around and you’ll see the why of it … I know it don’t make much sense but it ain’t supposed to until you get there …”

These words smolder in Sam’s soul for years and his obsession controls a life that is a solitary struggle for self and purpose. He works in secret, trespassing, lying, and doing whatever it takes to continue his quest.His long, lonely, and dangerous trips to the far reaches of West Texas cost him dearly in terms of time and money as he sacrifices love, friendship, and family pursuing his elusive goal.

When a solution to the riddle emerges … THE FEVER takes over and nothing, not even a new love interest, can stop him from recklessly planning another more challenging and perilous trip. He is certain that he will either find something out in the wilderness, or die trying.

My thoughts:

I opened the novel with quiet expectation and hope. Unfortunately i was disappointed. Even though the novel was written using correct grammar, it did fall short of my expectations.

I had two problems with Frenske’s storytelling. The most obvious to me was the repetitive nature of the novel. The story is written from three points of view and often a character would repeat what had already been stated. I found the repetition tedious and was often tempted to skim over the lines in order to pass over what had already been stated by another character; or by the main character’s ruminations of the past.

The second issue that I had with Frenske’s storytelling is that he would often tell the reader information that could be inferred. I am definitely a reader who prefers being shown and not told and felt that the author did not trust the reader’s prior knowledge and instinct in determining what could have happened in the past. Being told everything did not engage me in the story and I felt no connection to it at all.

The Fever is grammatically correct but it in no way encouraged me to feel any emotion. The 277 page novel could have been written as a much shorter story which could have left me feeling a lot more satisfied.

I give this novel a disappointing ⭐️ 1 star

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 94th in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: Pressure Point by Jessie Kwak

I was excited to read the third novel in the Bulari Saga by Jessie Kwak. As I admired the cover of Pressure Point, I itched to crack open the pages and begin reading.

Genre: Science Fiction

Blurb:

Peace demands its price in blood.

Jaantzen may have brought stability to the city of Bulari, but not everyone’s grateful. Allegiances are shifting sand, and he’s made a miscalculation that earned him a deadly new enemy — one who plays a viciously different game than the one Jaantzen is used to winning.

Jaantzen and his crew fight to gain the upper hand, but secrets buried in shallow graves are coming back to haunt them. And as Starla and Toshiyo edge closer to understanding the growing mystery that’s been dropped in their laps, their search is awakening darker things than any of them can imagine.

Peace comes at a price, and this Pax Bulari could cost Jaantzen everyone he loves.

My thoughts:

The pressure in Kwak’s story is definitely building in the third installment in Bulari Saga. The consequences of the action taken in the second novel are realised and the reader sees how the characters are figuring out how to deal with these consequences. What I enjoy is that the people in the story stay true to their character – each behaves as I would expect them too. I still have my favourites and I continue cheering them on as I read.

A little romance is developing in the story and it adds another dimension to the storyline. The romance shows that the characters are human and, as such, have feelings for one another. I am certainly curious to see where the romantic relationship leads; and whether it will change the decisions that will be made.

As with the previous two episodes in the story, Kwak’s pace is pitched perfectly. I could not help but turn the pages and found it difficult to put the novel down. And the end of the novel left me wanting more – I definitely cannot wait to read the next installment in the series!

In order to enjoy Pressure Point, it is important to have read the previous two novels in the series. But it is never to late to start reading from book 1! If enjoy reading science fiction and gangster-type stories, Kwak’s saga is one you need to pick up. You would enjoy the fast-paced tale with smatterings of humour and a touch of romance.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 93rd in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: Kingdom of Souls by Rena Barron

At the Frenzy Presents event in late August, I learned about Rena Barron’s novel Kingdom of Souls. The fantasy aspect of the novel interested me; and the African theme running through the story intrigued me. Soon after the event, I pre-ordered the novel online.

Genre: Young Adult Fiction, Fantasy

Blurb:

Explosive fantasy set in a world of magic and legend, where one girl must sacrifice her life, year by year, to gain the power necessary to fight the mother she has never been good enough for.

Arrah is a young woman from a long line of the most powerful witch doctors in the land. But she fails at magic, fails to call upon the ancestors and can’t even cast the simplest curse.

Shame and disappointment dog her.

When strange premonitions befall her family and children in the kingdom begin to disappear, Arrah undergoes the dangerous and scorned process of selling years of her life for magic. This borrowed power reveals a nightmarish betrayal and a danger beyond what she could have imagined. Now Arrah must find a way to master magic, or at least buy it, in order to save herself and everything she holds dear.

An explosive fantasy set in a world of magic and legend with a twist you will never see coming.

My thoughts:

The beginning of Kingdom of Souls by Rena Barron was not easy to read as I had to familiarise myself with the unusual names as well as the references to African culture. Often I found myself wishing for a name chart at the beginning of the novel so that I could refer to it and set it clear in my mind who was related to whom, and in what way they were connected.

Once I got used to the unusual names and had a clear picture in my mind where everyone fit in, it was easier to focus on the story. And what a story it was! Details were intricately woven in between the actions of the characters; characters that reflect the range of personalities that are found in the world. Within the Kingdom, there are kind and gentle people as well as people who are cruel and who adversely affect the lives of others.

The heroine, Arrah, is a young woman who tries to rectify the actions of someone she loves. As she goes on her journey, she grows as a person. She is one who perseveres and, as such, is a good role model to any young person reading this novel. Arrah is a character who discovers who she is and who discovers the magic she has within herself. Her journey is difficult but, with the help of her friends, she is able to realise her potential.

Kingdom of Souls is not an easy read and is more suitable for a young person who enjoys a more literary type of novel. Magic is a thread that runs through the story and is perfect for fans of fantasy novels. The ethos of African culture is a bonus and will appeal to those who are looking to connect with or explore the beauty of this culture. As an adult, I enjoyed the symbolism and imagery I read in Barron’s words. This is a novel I would highly recommend.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 92nd in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson

On Instagram, I kept seeing good reviews of Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson. As well as being a Fantasy novel, the story featured a library. I could not resist and decided to immerse myself in the story.

Genre: Young Adult Fiction, Fantasy

Blurb:

All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather. She hopes to become a warden, charged with protecting the kingdom from their power.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire. Elisabeth’s desperate intervention implicates her in the crime, and she is torn from her home to face justice in the capital. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined. 

My thoughts:

From the first pages of the novel, I was swept away by the story and the beautiful imagery. The language definitely drew me in and I often paused in my reading of the story to appreciate it. Rogerson used words to create beautiful pictures in my mind; images that are a perfect fit for a fantasy novel.

Sorcery of Thorns is set within the walls of Great Libraries and features a heroine who works within one such library. Her name is Elizabeth Scrivener. Such a clever last name, don’t you think, especially as she works in a library filled with scribed books. I enjoyed, too, that all books within the library are magical (precisely the way I see books) and are thus labelled grimoires.

The heroine, Elisabeth, sets out on a mission to save the Libraries and, while doing so, sets out on an adventure of self-discovery. The unexpected ups and downs of the story were thoroughly enjoyable for me and I flipped the pages quickly. This was one of those books that I couldn’t wait to continue reading when I got home from work. And it was definitely one that encouraged me to ignore the TV remote!

I enjoyed Robertson’s unusual heroine, as well as her counterpart, Nathaniel. Reading about Nathaniel and his demon was interesting and, even though one should Not enjoy a demon character, I did. Silas is definitely not what one would expect of such a creature.

Sorcery of Thorns is a beautifully written fantasy story that will enfold you in its magic. The bonus is that the novel is set in a bookish environment. I loved this story – as shown by the amount of post-its I placed throughout the novel. This beautiful book is a novel that I recommend to those who enjoy stories about magic and a young woman who grows to know herself better.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 5 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 91st in my book pledge for 2019)

Book Review: Break In Case of Emergency by Brian Francis

Harper Collins Canada held a #FrenzyPresents event earlier this month at which they promoted the Young Adult book written by Brian Francis, Break In Case of Emergency. I had the opportunity to attend and meet the author so I was curious to read the novel the folks at Harper Collins were enthusiastically promoting.

Genre: Young Adult Fiction, Contemporary, LGBT

Blurb:

Life has been a struggle for Toby Goodman. Her mother died by suicide five years ago, and her father left their small town before Toby was born. Now a teenager living on her grandparents’ dairy farm, Toby has trouble letting people in. She keeps even her closest friend, the brash but endearing Trisha, at arms’ length, and recently ended her first relationship, with Trisha’s burnout brother, Mike. Convinced that she is destined to follow her mother’s path, Toby creates a plan to escape her pain.

But with the news that her father is coming home and finally wants to meet her, Toby must face the truth of her family’s story. Not only is her father gay, but he’s also a world-famous female impersonator—and a self-absorbed, temperamental man-child who is ill-prepared to be a real parent.

When Toby’s careful plans go awry, she is forced to rebuild the life she thought she knew from the ground up. While she may not follow an expected path, through the support of a quirky but lovable circle of friends and family, Toby may finally put together the many different pieces that make up her past, her present, and her future.

My thoughts:

I do admit to beginning this novel with high expectations as it had been avidly promoted. The story also interested me as it dealt with possible mental health issues that so many teens face at this time of their lives. I think it is good that there is literature like this out there to help teen readers realise that they are not alone when experiencing suicidal thoughts or even feelings of worthlessness.

The story is written from the point of view of a teenage girl who does feel worthless; and who comes to believe that the people she is surrounded by would be better off without her. She does have a raw deal: growing up with her grandparents without a dad around, her mom having committed suicide. Francis places us right inside the mind of Toby Goodman, a girl who is having suicidal thoughts. We read of how her mind circles around suicide and why it would be such a good thing for her to do. There were moments, to be honest, when I felt that the thoughts expressed were a bit repetitive and I wished the story would move on – though I can understand that the writer wanted to reflect how a depressed person would focus on the negative and constantly obsess on a point.

Toby Goodman meets her dad who is a well-known drag queen. Not much time is spent on the encounter and subsequent meetings though. At the end of the novel, I wished that more had been written of their interaction. The moment of meeting her dad does help Toby come to certain realisations about herself, and even about her mom. Meeting her dad does put to rest some concerns that Toby had about her mother and her own relationship with her.

Toby is a character that grows in the story. She learns about herself and about what is important to her. She comes to learn more about the people in her lives; and begins to see herself through their eyes. The novel suggests to the reader that in our lives we are part of a group; and that we each have our role within that group. Out role is important and our actions do affect the others around us in a negative or positive way.

Break In Case of Emergency is a novel that celebrates a person who can overcome extreme sadness with the help of those around her. It celebrates that we, as people, can overcome the challenges in our ordinary lives with the love of those in our lives. This contemporary young adult novel will be one of those stories that can help young teens realise that they are not alone; and that they can look to the support of family and friends to help them through difficult times.

I give this novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 3 stars

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2019

(This novel was the 90th in my book pledge for 2019)