Completed Mystery Afghan

kitimage-crochetAt the beginning of Summer, I completed the Mystery Afghan that I had begun with Michael Sellick and The Crochet Crowd. I had fallen behind as I wanted to make a larger blanket (when the required twenty squares were joined, the resulting size was for a crib or a lap afghan). In addition, when the warmer days came along, there were times when I had to set my work aside.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
The border. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Once I had completed and joined the forty squares, I decided that I needed to increase the width of the border to give the blanket a little more width. I also had quite a bit of the yarn left over which I wanted to use for the project. I used the pattern suggested and increased the number of rows in the middle section. My colour choices were determined by the amount of yarn that I had left over.

 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Completed CAL. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

The project is now complete and I am pleased with the choices that I hadmade: the colours, the increased size, and the wider border. The blanket is now folded and waiting to be used on colder evenings.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Completed CAL Afghan. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I enjoyed crocheting this afghan. I am not sure, though, whether I would do this pattern again as it is very time-consuming. I will, however, use the braided joining technique as well as the pattern for the border.

If you wish to crochet a similar afghan, head on over to the Yarnspirations website where all the clues are detailed. In addition to the pattern, you will find the videos that were created by Michael Sellick.

Do you enjoy using crocheted afghans?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

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Mystery Afghan 2015 – Clue 5

As I expected, the next clue (clue 5) in the Mystery Afghan was adding a centerpiece to the granny square.

For this clue I could not rely on the diagram to help me understand the stitches – I watched Mikey’s video (from The Crochet Crowd) to understand how to create the flower. Once I understood, however, the clue finished up very quickly and I waited for the following week to continue with the afghan.

When I read the next clue, I saw that we were expected to join the squares. Placing my squares on the bed, I realised that this afghan would be too small to use – the size suggested was suitable for a crib or a small child. I decided to double the size of my afghan and thus began making twenty more squares.

I have now completed forty squares and have begun joining them. Working on enlarging my afghan has made me fall behind the rest of the crocheters who have worked on this afghan (in fact, most of them have completed the challenge). I am okay with that, though, as my result will give me an afhgan that can be used by myself and my family.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Forty Squares laid out. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

kitimage-crochetPrevious posts on the Mystery Afghan 2015

Yarn Choice

Clue 1

Clue 2

Clue 3

Clue 4

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

A Christmas Project

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
A crocheted bedspread. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

When my stepson saw my completed crochet project on my bed, I could tell that he loved it. He lay on the bed with my girls and insisted I take a photo of the three of them with the blanket as the background. He took a picture of the bedspread showing the detail of the work which he would later put on Instagram. Given his reaction, I asked him whether he would put the bedspread on his bed if I made him one. The response was a resounding “Yes!”. My next question was what colours he would like. With the help of his sisters, he chose his colours; the choice reflecting those of a comforter we had bought when he was a teenager. The very next weekend, I went with my daughters and we bought the wool I needed to begin my next big project.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

My stepson’s favourite colour is blue, so this colour had to feature in the blanket. I began making the granny squares for the bedspread and, while I was doing so, thought that I would do it a little differently to what I had done for the one covering my bed. Instead of doing one row of the featured colours, I thought that I would do two. I was hoping as well that if I had to change the colour of the yarn less often, I would make the squares a lot faster. I wanted to make this in time for Christmas – and I would not be on vacation with plenty of time to crochet.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

The second colour for the bedspread is yellow – not too pale and not too dark either. I like the contrast of the colours and I am sure the recipient of this gift will too. The shades of the colours remind me too of the comforter we had bought for him when I was first married to his dad. He loved that comforter and I am sure he will love this bedspread too. Looking at the granny squares, I am satisfied with the choice I made to use the same colour for two rows – it seems to suit the bold blue. While I was doing the first few squares, I thought maybe I should try making the squares a little bigger than for my previous project. This decision would certainly make the bedspread look a little different to the one I had already made.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Joining the squares into strips. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

I have been working on the blanket for six weeks now. Last weekend, I decided to start joining the squares that I have completed as I wanted to see if I had made enough yet. I joined the squares into strips. I lay the strips on my bed to determine how many to use across the bed (my stepson has the same size bed as we do). Using the suggestion my mom had made, I joined all the squares into strips, working the threads away as I went along. Once all the strips were done, I got to working on joining the strips. This I did while relaxing on my bed and watching a movie on Netflix. It was a little cold last weekend so I did not mind having the heavy blanket covering my legs.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Joining the strips. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

After joining the squares, I discovered I should do one more row. I am currently working on that and will begin the border thereafter.

What project are you currently working on?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post is linked to Paula’s Thursday’s Special challenge)

A Joining Decision

During the summer I have been working on the bedspread I am making since I picked up the hook once again.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Working on a row of granny squares. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

When I had 50 granny squares stacked in my bag, I decided I needed to join them. Laying them out so I could have an idea in my head what they would look like, I searched the internet for ways in which I could use to join them.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Laying out the granny squares. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

I knew that I did not want to sew them together. In the past I have crocheted the squares together and I knew I wanted to do the same. After much browsing on YouTube, I decided to use the double crochet stitch to join them.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Joining granny squares. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

I liked the look of the ridge that is formed when joining and decided that I would use it for the right side of my bedspread.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Joined granny squares. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

After joining the first two rows, I decided to create my rows of eight squares – and then join the rows together.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Rows waiting to be joined. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

With the joining of the rows, the blanket started to grow and get heavy. I would sit with my feet up and cover my legs on the few cool days we had.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Relaxing while joining squares. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Once I had joined all the squares, I saw that I had reached the halfway mark of my project.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Halfway to a bedspread. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Fifty squares had been made and joined but I had quite a few more to make.

What project are you currently working on?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

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Picking up the Hook