Completed Mystery Afghan

kitimage-crochetAt the beginning of Summer, I completed the Mystery Afghan that I had begun with Michael Sellick and The Crochet Crowd. I had fallen behind as I wanted to make a larger blanket (when the required twenty squares were joined, the resulting size was for a crib or a lap afghan). In addition, when the warmer days came along, there were times when I had to set my work aside.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
The border. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Once I had completed and joined the forty squares, I decided that I needed to increase the width of the border to give the blanket a little more width. I also had quite a bit of the yarn left over which I wanted to use for the project. I used the pattern suggested and increased the number of rows in the middle section. My colour choices were determined by the amount of yarn that I had left over.

 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Completed CAL. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

The project is now complete and I am pleased with the choices that I hadmade: the colours, the increased size, and the wider border. The blanket is now folded and waiting to be used on colder evenings.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Completed CAL Afghan. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I enjoyed crocheting this afghan. I am not sure, though, whether I would do this pattern again as it is very time-consuming. I will, however, use the braided joining technique as well as the pattern for the border.

If you wish to crochet a similar afghan, head on over to the Yarnspirations website where all the clues are detailed. In addition to the pattern, you will find the videos that were created by Michael Sellick.

Do you enjoy using crocheted afghans?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

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Mystery Afghan 2015 – Clue 5

As I expected, the next clue (clue 5) in the Mystery Afghan was adding a centerpiece to the granny square.

For this clue I could not rely on the diagram to help me understand the stitches – I watched Mikey’s video (from The Crochet Crowd) to understand how to create the flower. Once I understood, however, the clue finished up very quickly and I waited for the following week to continue with the afghan.

When I read the next clue, I saw that we were expected to join the squares. Placing my squares on the bed, I realised that this afghan would be too small to use – the size suggested was suitable for a crib or a small child. I decided to double the size of my afghan and thus began making twenty more squares.

I have now completed forty squares and have begun joining them. Working on enlarging my afghan has made me fall behind the rest of the crocheters who have worked on this afghan (in fact, most of them have completed the challenge). I am okay with that, though, as my result will give me an afhgan that can be used by myself and my family.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Forty Squares laid out. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

kitimage-crochetPrevious posts on the Mystery Afghan 2015

Yarn Choice

Clue 1

Clue 2

Clue 3

Clue 4

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Mystery Afghan 2015 – Clue 4

I was enjoying the creation of my Mystery Afghan and decided to continue with it. The following clue was to make the square bigger (Clue 4 can be found here) by adding two rounds to the square.

I found this clue to be quick and simple to do and was thus easily able to keep up with all those who were doing the crochet along.

The square now looked more complete to me with the white edging. I felt that something had to be created in the middle to complete the layering work.

kitimage-crochetPrevious posts on the Mystery Afghan 2015

Yarn Choice

Clue 1

Clue 2

clue 3

What do you think the next step will be?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Mystery Afghan 2015 – Clue 3

While on my blogging break, I continued crocheting the 2015 Mystery Afghan hosted by Mikey at The Crochet Crowd. For the third week, the challenge was to crochet layers onto the granny square – something I had not done before. (You can download the third clue on the Yarspirations website). Even though I had not done layering before, the stitches in the pattern were all familiar to me.

I completed the first square and liked the colour combination I had chosen. I was a bit curious as to what would become of the lilac corners.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
A completed square for clue 3. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I decided to work on one colour at a time which made it easier for me to learn the pattern.

At this time of the crochet along, I was still working in tandem with other crocheters – and waiting eagerly for Tuesdays and the unveiling of the next clue.

kitimage-crochetPrevious posts on the Mystery Afghan 2015

Yarn Choice

Clue 1

Clue 2

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Mystery Afghan 2015 – Clue 2

This weekend I worked on the Mystery Afghan in order to complete the second clue before the next step is emailed out. The challenge this past week was to crochet a cross onto the granny square. (You can download the second clue here). Working on this clue, I learnt a new stitch: the front post single crochet. I watched Mikey’s video a few times in order to understand what I had to do – and I even crocheted along with him:

The first square took me a while to do as I stopped and started the video often.

I eventually understood the pattern and, after doing a few squares, I no longer needed to refer to the drawing I had printed out.

This clue was quick to do and I am curious to see what the next step is. When I get home this afternoon, I will be checking my email to see what it is!

kitimage-crochet

Previous posts on the Mystery Afghan 2015

Yarn Choice

Clue 1

What do you think the next step will be?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Mystery Afghan 2015 – Clue 1

During the past week I worked on the first clue for the Mystery Afghan 2015. (If you want to join in, you can get the first clue here). The clue is to make 20 basic granny squares of 4 rows in the main contrast colour (contrast A).

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Working on clue #1 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I was pleased to see that the clue contained a drawing for me to follow (the written instructions are on the first page) as I find it easier to read and understand the drawings as opposed to the written instructions. My main contrast colour is white and so I began my squares with this basic colour.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Clue #1 completed. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

If you wish to participate in the Crochet Along but are unsure of how to create a granny square, Michael Sellick’s video is helpful:

 

This week I completed clue #1 and am now ready to begin on the second clue. I am a little behind schedule but that is to be expected as I am doing my crocheting in between my work for the course I am following.

kitimage-crochet

Previous posts on the Mystery Afghan 2015

Yarn Choice

If you are doing this crochet along, feel free to post your work in the comments below. 

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Mystery Afghan 2015

Late last year I discovered The Crochet Crowd on Facebook. I have grown to love the community for the projects that everyone shares, the positive comments and feedback, and the advice that the host, Michael Sellick (Mikey), shares. During the month of January, I watched as people posted photos of their attempts at the January challenge. It was interesting to see the different colour combinations as well as how people extended the challenge.

kitimage-crochetThis month the people at The Crochet Crowd are crocheting a Mystery Afghan – and I have decided to join in. The Afghan was created by the designers of Yarnspirations and Mikey is leading the way. After I signed up (in order to receive the clues), I had to go shopping for yarn. I looked at the suggested colours but the colour combinations did not suit my tastes. I decided instead to choose my own and hope that the colours will be suitable for the final result.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Colour combination for the Mystery Afghan 2015. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I decided to use the recommended yarn: Caron Simply Soft, 170 g / 6 oz Balls, 288 meters / 315 yards. This yarn can be washed and dried in the machine. I bought the following:

  • Contrast A – 4 Balls (white).
  • Contrast B – 2 Balls (purple)
  • Contrast C – 2 Balls (cerise)
  • Contrast D – 2 Balls (lilac)

Contrast A is the main colour of the afghan and will be the dominant colour. In addition to the yarn, I need a size 5.0mm or H/8 Crochet Hook which I already have in my drawer. I look forward to unravelling the mystery as I crochet along with many people around the world.

Have you made a Mystery Afghan?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

Completing the Ripple

As you all know, about six weeks ago I decided to learn the ripple stitch in crochet. Once I had done about 12 rows, I understood the pattern and was able to continue without looking at the instructions.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Time to work the edges. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I reached the required size for the baby blanket and began to work the edges once I had sewn in all the loose threads. I had to think a bit on how to finish the work as the pattern I had worked from did not suggest an edging. After a few attempts, I managed to create a result that I was happy with using the double crochet stitch.

I decided to follow the “simple is best policy” as I did not want to detract from the beauty of the ripple stitch.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Completing the edge. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

As I laid the blanket out to view and photograph, I was pleased with the result. I hope that when I give the mother-to-be the blanket in March, she will be happy with it and that it will be used for many years to come.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Baby blanket made with the ripple stitch. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I enjoyed using this stitch and I am sure that I will make another blanket like this. At least next time I will not spend too much time working out the pattern 🙂

Inspire-Me-Monday-Button-1502Do you agree with using a simple edging?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

(This post is linked to Inspire Me Monday)

 

Grateful for Old Crochet Magazines

Not only did my mother send me a beautiful quilt through my cousin, but she sent some old crochet magazines as well.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Old crochet magazines. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I remember browsing through these magazines when I was a teenager, looking for something to make. Now as I page through them, I remember sitting on the bed with my mom looking at them;  and I remember her teaching me how to read the diagrams and work the stitches. I am grateful this week, not only for the vintage patterns found in these magazines, but also for the memories that they bring to my mind.

Processed with RookieWhat have you been grateful for this week?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

(Join me and share something that you have been grateful for in the past week. Link up with my post and feel free to use the badge my daughter created. )

I enjoy reading what others are grateful for – the posts make me think of other things I am happy to have in my life. Please remember to send me a pingback so that I know you have participated. 

Sylvia shares Seeing Double in Florida

Learning the Ripple

Now that I have begun crocheting again, I decided to learn more stitches. A colleague of mine is pregnant with her first child (a boy) so I decided to take the opportunity to make a baby blanket and learn a stitch I often admire on Instagram: the ripple stitch. The first thing I had to do was find a pattern. Eventually I settled on the pattern I found on the website Handcrafting With Love. I did, however, have a little difficulty understanding the instructions (I am used to following diagrams) so I looked for a video to help me understand the process a little more:

 

Then I began working on the stitch.

I was unsure at first whether I was following the pattern correctly as my work looked nothing like what I had seen in the pictures. However, once I had changed colour and worked eight rows, I could begin to see the resemblance.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015
Working the Ripple stitch. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

I worked on the rows eagerly and was soon able to work the stitch without constant reference to the pattern.

I like the way the blanket is turning out and will soon be finished with all the rows. Then the next step will be working out how to do the edges!

Inspire-Me-Monday-Button-1502Do you like the effect of the ripple stitch?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2015

(This post is linked to Inspire me Monday)