Mauritian Billboards

I am used to the sight of billboards along the highways that advertise a range of products. In Mauritius, however, there are no highways as are seen in large countries. Instead billboards are placed in most unusual settings. On top of walls that separate neighbouring houses:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (1). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

In the space between the road and a house:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (2). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

On the side of 3 storey buildings:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (3). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

On the roof of a home:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (4). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Or the roof of an abandoned building:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (5). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

On the roof of a store:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (6). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

And, of course, at the entrance into the city:

 © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
Mauritian Billboards (7). © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

The small island of Mauritius has made efficient use of its space in order to advertise its products. As a visitor, I found it interesting and innovative.

Have you seen innovative ways of placing billboards?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

(This post was inspired by Jake’s prompt: billboard)

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A Mauritian Street Scene

When we were in Mauritius, we came across a street scene I could not resist capturing. The men were sitting outside chatting, passing the time of day.

A Mauritian Street Scene. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
A Mauritian Street Scene. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

The group of friends was not what attracted my attention though. What I admired was the Dodo that had been painted on the wall.

The Mauritian Dodo. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014
The Mauritian Dodo. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

A beautiful dedication to a bird that has long been extinct.

Do you often see painted dedications on walls?

(This post has been inspired by the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2014

Infinite Tranquillity

The moment I step into a church I sense the tranquillity of the place – especially when the church has emptied of its occupants and there are no longer voices echoing between the walls.

Inside a Mauritian church. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Inside a Mauritian church. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The rows of benches stretch over the interior of the quiet church give one the impression of infinite tranquillity.

What do you sense when you step inside a church?

(This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge by WordPress)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Tempting Colour

The colours in Mauritius seem to be brighter and richer – and this is certainly the case when it comes to the fruit that has been ripened by the warm sun. We were spending the day in Port Louis when we came across this hawker selling a brightly coloured fruit that instantly attracted my eye.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Hawker selling raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

“That looks delicious,” I told my husband. I had to stop and look closer.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Brightly-coloured raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The vendor was very gracious as he allowed us to snap pictures of his wares.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Delicious-looking raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

After taking the pictures, my husband searched in his pockets for some rupees so that we could taste the richly-coloured fruit.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Raspberries. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I did not take any of the sugar the vendor offered to sprinkle on top of the fruit. Instead I savoured the tangy taste of sun-ripened fruit. Eating the fruit on the side of the road was definitely a treat.

Are you tempted to buy fruit from sidewalk vendors?

(This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge hosted by WordPress.)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

A Delicious Treat

During our trip to Mauritius, my husband took many opportunities to eat a favourite meal of his childhood: Dahl Pourri. On my first trip with him to this tropical island, he had converted me to this delicious treat so I was willing to eat this meal whenever we could. The roti-like food has dahl within it, and has been rolled until it is fine. You eat “une paire” with a yummy vegetarian curry within it.

Dahl Pourri. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Dahl Pourri. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

We have tried to recreate this food at home but have not been successful. Making them is definitely an art that requires plenty of practice. I know that the next time we go to Mauritius, we are sure to go buy many of these and eat our fill.

Have you eaten Dahl Pourri?

(This post was inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge prompt given by WordPress)

A Stained Glass Window

The windows we have looking out onto the world can be made to look interesting: the fabric we choose to surround them with can be rich and colourful; flowers can be placed near them to enhance the look; sofas can be placed near them to encourage one to look out and daydream.

The type of window I do admire the most, though, is the stained glass window made in years gone by. The aim of the window is not to encourage one to look out; instead it encourages one to reflect on the scene being presented. In the big cathedrals, many stories are told by the artist within the glass. When we visited some of the churches in Mauritius, I was surprised to see that even some of the smaller churches have these colourful windows. At the one church in particular, I admired the windows that surround the Virgin Mary.

Stained glass windows of the Virgin Mary. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Stained glass windows of the Virgin Mary. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The light shining through the glass enhanced the spirituality the artist had focused on.

Do you enjoy looking at stained glass windows in churches?

(This post was inspired by Jake’s prompt: window)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

A Tropical Island Escape

The best form of escape from the day to day routine of our lives is to escape to a tropical island for a couple of weeks. I do not need the excitement of bungee jumping, or the adventures of painting the town red. What I enjoy escaping to is the beauty and calmness one can get from soaking up the atmosphere of a tropical beach.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A perfect escape to relaxation. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Relaxing in the warm air and listening to the sound of the surf is one of my favourite ways to escape to relaxation. I close my eyes and my soul absorbs the tranquillity of nature.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Mauritian beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

On our trip to Mauritius, we came across a number of beaches that tempted us to enjoy the beauty of the beach and the hypnotic sound of the waves crashing on the shore. Not all beaches were postcard perfect; but the rocky ones had a beauty all of the own.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A rocky beach in Roches Noires, Mauritius. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The tropical beach is the perfect escape not only during the day, but also when the sun is setting. The oranges of the sunset give the sand and water a beauty you wish you could capture and hold within you for a long time.

Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Sunset on a Mauritian Beach. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

Walking on the beaches at dusk certainly add another dimension to your escape from the rat race.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2012
Grand Baie, Mauritius at dusk. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2012

I enjoyed my last escape to a tropical island – and I know I will enjoy the next one.

Do you ever escape to island beaches?

(This post was inspired by the prompt Weekly Photo Challenge prompt: Escape)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The Seven Coloured Earths

During our visit to Mauritius, my husband and I had to take our children to Chamerel to see the seven coloured earths. This tourist attraction is found in the Riviere Noire District in the south-western part of Mauritius. Seven distinct colours of sand can be seen in this area:red, brown, violet, green, blue, purple and yellow.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A view of the sands as we entered the area. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The area has changed and become more of a tourist attraction site since my last visit. In addition to the fee that is now charged, people are kept off of the sands. I recall standing on the dunes during my first visit and being able to touch the sands. Now it is all fenced off to prevent people from digging into the sands.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
The contrast between the dunes and the surrounding forest. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

If one looks carefully, one can see some sign of soil erosion near the roots of the trees – probably one of the reasons why the area is now more protected.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Noticing soil erosion. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

We found that when we looked at the sands from a shady area, the colours of the sands were more evident.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A view from the shade. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

We could see the different hues and the almost striped effect of the sands.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Looking down at the sand dunes. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

I like the contrast between the uncovered sands and the dense forest area that surrounds the dunes.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Showcasing the seven colours. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

It was an interesting trip – and our children enjoyed seeing something that they had not known existed. As for myself, it was interesting to notice the changes that had occured since my last visit.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Myself in front of the seven coloured earths. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Have you been to see the seven coloured earths?

(This post was inspired by Jake’s prompt: Attraction)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Colour of a market

When visiting Port Louis in Mauritius, one of the “must-see” places to go to is the market. In a previous post, I shared with you our experience when we visited the meat market. Our visit to the building opposite the meat market was a lot more colourful. And, as my daughter remarked, it smelled a lot better!

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Tomato Display. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

One of the first colours we noticed when we entered the fruit and vegetable market was the red of the tomato display. They looked ripe and appealing as we passed, and would surely tempt us if we were planning to buy any vegetables that day.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Fruit Display. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The fruit was certainly tempting, the sweet scent tempting us to buy some to snack on.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Fresh Vegetable Display. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Even the green vegetables looked bright and fresh. The vegetables were not refrigerated and must have been picked early that morning. The leafy greens were not wilted, however, as the building was cool and a sharp contrast to the warm weather outside.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A leafy green display. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

When weighing the produce, the seller used these old fashioned scales – scales that are not seen in the stores I normally frequent.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A Banana Display. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

We had to, of course, stop and buy some bananas. A quick, sweet snack which was enjoyed by us all.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Patty Pans. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Patty Pans were a vegetable I had not eaten in a while (I do not see them on sale in the Northern Hemisphere). What amazed me was the size of them as they lay in the basket.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Close up of Patty Pans. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

They looked delicious and firm lying there, and I knew I had to have a taste before I headed back to the north.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Green vegetables. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The array of green produce available was astounding, each leaf fresh-looking. By the number of people milling in the market, I am sure many of these leaves were cooked in the evening.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Another fruit display. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Amongst the fruit, a seller was offering small cakes to eat. I did not find these as tempting as the fruit lying in front.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
The fruit and vegetable market in Port Louis. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

As we exited the market, I looked back and knew I had enjoyed this walk through more than I had the one at the meat market.

Do you visit fruit and vegetable markets?

(This post was inspired by the folks at WordPress.com. The prompt this week is colour)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

A Rocky Bay

When visiting Mauritius, we spent a few nights in Roches Noires, on the north-east side of the island. We could not do any swimming from the beach in front of us, but the view was stunning.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Looking out from a bay at Roches Noires. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Looking out onto the bay, I enjoyed the view of the black rocks jutting out of the water – a far cry from the sandy beaches that are normally advertised for this island.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A rocky bay. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Those rocks had many hidey-holes in which my children found shells and saw some wriggling sea life.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Fishing boats. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The fishing boats were anchored, ready for use by the early morning fishermen.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
Tethered fishing boats in Roches Noires. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

The grey clouds were reflected in the water: water which felt cold as we dipped our toes in.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A rocky beach at Roches Noires. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

Not much sand could be found on the beach in front of the bungalow we were staying in. To swim, we would have to take a quick walk to the public beach.

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013
A view of Roches Noires. © Colline Kook-Chun, 2013

A little further along we found a small stretch of beach on which to sit and enjoy the view. I found the time we had there calming and rejuvenating. Another special moment in a holiday crammed with special moments.

Have you visited a rocky bay? Where was it?

(This post was inspired by Jake’s prompt: Bay. Head on over to his site to see links to more interpretations)

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2013