Back To The Past

PHOTO PROMPT © Dale Rogerson

A new day was to begin. Pathways had been cleared during the night, the plough’s work breaking the night’s quiet. Once the sun had risen, the roads would be filled with the trudging footsteps of weary workers. The promised New Beginning had morphed into a living nightmare. Life had returned to the decades of hardship filled with mind-numbing labour. The exorcism of technology had benefited a few – those with power and money. The middle class had joined the working class and the habit of living from day to day. Would they ever have the energy and mindset to revolt?

© Colline Kook-Chun, 2020

(This post was inspired by Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle. The challenge asks for bloggers to write a story in 100 words or less in response to the photo prompt.)

35 thoughts on “Back To The Past

  1. That’s a grim vision of the future. I’m not sure the rich can stay rich without technology, or indeed that they would or should foreswear it, even if that were possible. But I liked the way you described the drudgery.

    Like

  2. Great dystopian scene, Colline – not too dissimilar to the world I have created in the novels I have written – and feels scarily believable in the current apathy we seem to be indulging in.

    Like

  3. Revolts only seem to happen when the common people feel they have nothing left to lose. People in the story are headed in that direction but not quite there yet. Scarce food should do it.

    Good reflection on real life. The pressure cooker.

    Like

  4. Your story is very similar to the history of Mao’s ‘Cultural Revolution’, and the reign of terror by the Khmer Rouge in Kampuchea. Both of these have been replaced by more liberal regimes. Technology is part of the answer, and I can’t see anybody giving that up voluntarily, can you?

    Like

  5. Humanity always seems to grow in cycles, sometimes circling back to the past before taking a leap into the future. I think a revolution will spring in the next generation. Love the perspective you’ve given.

    Like

Share what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.