The Daily Five

Cover of "The Daily Five"
Cover of The Daily Five

I am currently reading a book on how to encourage literacy in the elementary classroom. The book, The Daily Five, was written by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser (also known as the sisters). The sisters write:

“The Daily Five is the largest part of our literacy curriculum each day – it is the structure that allows all children to do meaningful work independently as we (the teachers) work in small groups and with individual children. The first weeks of school are dedicated to launching the Daily Five and instilling literacy habits that allow for independent work with little or no teacher supervision.” (Boushey & Moser, 2006, p.13)

As I am reading through this text, I am taking note of the strategies I can use in my own classroom to encourage my students to become independent readers; and to have a love for reading. I find the content of this book exciting as well as practical. I look forward to implementing the suggestions in my classroom during the next academic year.

What book are you reading this week? Share a teaser in the comments section – or the link to your post if you have written about it.Β 

(This post was inspired by Miz B’s Teaser Tuesdays in which you share a few lines from the book you are currently reading.)

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43 thoughts on “The Daily Five

  1. Just like the excellent teacher you are. Continuing her education and looking after her students welfare even while school is out. Your students are lucky to have you!

    BE ENCOURAGED! BE BLESSED!

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    1. Thank you Francine. During school time I never get the chance to read for my improvement – and I have quite a few I want to get through this summer πŸ™‚

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  2. What an interesting book! I still haven’t read any “educational” book since I finished college, but there was a point in my life when I read self-help books than novels. Now, I am reading more novels. πŸ™‚

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    1. I decide I had to read the original text as I had heard so much about it. It is always better, I find, to read the whole thing myself rather than depend on the bits and pieces you hear of in workshops.
      And, of course, I do read my novels in between πŸ™‚

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  3. The only reading I am doing so far are the blogs on WordPress Colline. What a mindful teacher you are indeed hon. I am sure they appreciate you very much and that your students will be so much better off because of it. πŸ˜€ *hugs*

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    1. I always wish to inspire confidence in my students with regards to their reading ability. In teaching the young ones I want them to see reading as a delight and not as a chore.

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  4. I have seen this theory at work in the classroom and I like it. I think that it works particularly well with children who are self-motivated, so kids who for whatever reason struggle with that, might need a little extra help. I am reading “Flight Behavior” by Barbara Kingsolver, it is excellent.

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    1. The strategies of The Daily Five are perfect for those who are struggling. While the class is engaged in reading activities, the teacher is able to spend time with individual students to help them.

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  5. I believe a love for reading is the greatest gift we can give a child. Neither of my parents were able to attend school past the age of 14 or 15, but because they could read, they were able to continue their education on their own by reading, and could hold their own with any college educated person.

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    1. You have given a perfect example of how reading can enhance our lives. I am grateful for this skill as it allows so many of us the opportunity to learn and to think on issues that are relevant to our lives.

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  6. Wow, Colline. You are getting ready to teach again this fall and it’s not even August yet? Kudos to you! πŸ™‚ Is there any advice you can share from this book that will help us parents encourage a love of reading within our children?

    Reflecting on what Kathy said above regarding routines, it made me think of when my children were young and I cared for others children while their parents worked outside the home. Routine, the expectation of what was coming next, was essential. When they were able to predict the course of the day, they were less anxious, happier and enjoyed the companionship of the others much more – less fighting!

    One mom asked me why one of her daughters kept asking for me during the weekend. I was perplexed because her two daughters always looked forward to seeing their mom at the end of the day and were very happy to go home. I asked her what they did on the weekend. She said that they visited family and friends for the two days without any particular plan in mind. Ah, there it is, I said. I don’t think it is me she is really looking for, it’s the routine she likes!

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    1. When I have finished the book Darlene, I will take you up on your suggestion and post some ideas for parents. It can only benefit your child if you can reinforce the lessons learned at school.
      I agree with you totally on routine Darlene, and that was the foundation of our days when my children were young. Even now we have a daily and weekly routine which they enjoy following. Part of their enjoyment of summer is that the routine followed during the school year is metamorphosed into a summer routine – sleeping late, watching TV, going to the library, reading,swimming.

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  7. Two books on my “Educational List” for the summer: Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives by Peter H. Johnston (he also wrote Choice Words-I have read chapters in this book for professional service courses and finally just bought the book outright) and Becoming a Literacy Leader: Supporting Learning and Change by Jennifer Allen. I will be expanding my duties as a literacy specialist and I thought this book would be helpful. The former will be required reading for the other part of my job as a reading interventionist.

    This week is my week to finally begin these books as I have been a mad writer (as you are well aware!).

    Just finished The 19th Wife by David Ebershoff. A modern day murder mystery set in Utah coupled with the story of An Eliza Young one of Brigham Young’s many wives who divorced him. David blends the story of a modern day polygamist sect with the story of the early LDS Church. Just riveting! Having read Jon Krakaur’s Under the Banner of Heaven last summer, it became a must read for me.

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    1. Thank you for sharing the titles of those educational books with me. Next time I am browsing in the bookshop I am going to have a look at them. The one by Allen looks appealing.

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  8. I am rereading Anne Frank’s “Diary of a Young Girl.” It’s a book I thought I should revisit as an adult after reading a blog post about it recently.

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    1. I remember reading that when I was a teen. I was thinking of getting it for my daughter to read as she has learned this year about WW2 and the concentration camps.

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  9. Daily five is used here…I didn’t know there was a book about it…perhaps I’ll get motivated to read it as well. It does appear to be a successful way to conduct literacy time. πŸ™‚

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    1. I agree from the little I have used. I am hoping that with reading the book I will get to know a little more and thus be able to implement more of the strategies.

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  10. Read The Daily Five. I thought it was interesting, but you need to live in an ideal world (school environment) to be able to have a classroom set up like they have in that book. After reading and one year of semi-implementation, it was semi-ditched and, as is the M.O. of the distinct I worked for at least, we moved on to the next trend. I will stop there before I do too much venting. I’m retired now, thankfully, and read for total pleasure. Nothing heavy. Just fun.
    (I got some very good ideas, but the strategies were short lived, as a new, more vigorous set of strategies were implemented. I hope you have a more stable, but innovative district to work for and that you can really enjoy the new ideas you’ve been introduced to.)

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    1. The school I worked at last academic year was a good place to implement these strategies. I am moving onto another school and will have to see what that environment is like in order to see whether the students will respond in the same way.

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    1. Thank you. I have come to realise the importance of reading as being skilled at it helps with so many things: writing, vocabulary, confidence, comprehension of a variety of texts.

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  11. Salman Rushdie, “The Enchantress of Florence”, Colline. I didn’t know what to expect and find that I am enjoying the lyrical language very much.
    What a hardworking mum and teacher you are! I read today’s blog on food before coming here. Ten out of ten for effort, Colline. πŸ™‚

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    1. Thank you Jo. I make the effort because I love children – my own and those who are in my charge for a year.
      I have not read any of Rushdie’s writing – though I have heard of his name because of his controversial book.

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